Certificate in Computing Applications

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Photo of example certificateOverview

The Certificate in Computing Applications is a cross-disciplinary course of study in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, and Business. It is designed for undergraduates not already enrolled in majors in Computer Science, Software Engineering, or Computer Engineering who wish to enhance their degree and employment possibilities by adding expertise in computing applications. The certificate program focuses on teaching students the essential skills required to develop and use computing applications in their subject domains.  This certificate program will help students to be successful in today's workplace, ensuring they have the basic knowledge of programming languages and computer systems needed to enhance their employment opportunities.

The certificate program is offered jointly among the three colleges and their respective departments housing the majors of computer science, computer engineering, software engineering, and management information systems.

The program consists of 9 credit hours selected from the core and 12 credits hours in electives. Of the 12 credit hours as electives applied to the certificate, no more than 9 can come from a single department.

Enrollment in the certificate

Students should fill the form at http://www.registrar.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/uploads/forms/Urequest.pdf and bring it to Computer Science Advising Center, 123 Atanasoff Hall.

For more information on this new certificate, please contact your academic advisor.

Requirements

  • 21 required credits.
  • To augment the skills or literacy needed to successfully complete the certificate, a student may take courses listed in the literacy/background course section. These courses do not count towards the certificate.
  • All pre-requisites will be enforced, but not all pre-reqs may count towards the certificate.
  • Courses applied to the certificate may not be taken on a pass not-pass basis.
  • At least 9 of the credits taken at Iowa State University must be in courses numbered 300 or above.
  • A minimum of 9 credits used for the certificate may not be used to meet any other department, college, or university requirement for the baccalaureate degree except to satisfy the total credit requirement for graduation and to meet credit requirements in courses numbered 300 or above.
  • A student may not receive both an undergraduate major and a certificate of the same name.
  • For students earning an Iowa State University baccalaureate degree, a certificate is awarded concurrent with or after the Iowa State University baccalaureate degree.
  • A certificate is not awarded until baccalaureate requirements are finished.
  • After receiving a baccalaureate degree from any accredited institution, a student may enroll at Iowa State University to earn a certificate.
  • A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 is required in courses taken at ISU for a certificate.
  • A notation of completed certificate will be made on the transcript.

Part 1 - Core

All Students will take:

  • COM S 252. Linux Operating System Essentials.

Students will complete 3 credits from one of the following:

  • COM S 107. Applied Computer Programming.
  • COM S/MIS 207. Fundamentals of Computer Programming.
  • COM S 227. Introduction to Object-oriented Programming.

Students will complete 3 credits from one of the following:

  • COM S 108X. Applied Computer Programming II.
  • COM S 208. Intermediate Computer Programming.
  • COM S 228. Introduction to Data Structures.

 

Part II - Electives

Minimum of 12 credits, no more than 9 credits can be applied to the certificate from a single discipline. At least 9 credits must be 300 level or above.

Electives courses applicable to the certificate are available from the following programs.

Accounting (ACCT); Aerospace Engineering (AER E); Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (A B E); Agronomy (AGRON); Animal Science (AN S); Apparel, Merchandising and Design (A M D); Architecture (ARCH); Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASTRO); Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology (BBMB); Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB); Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCBIO); Biological/Pre-Medical Illustration (BPM I); Biology (BIOL); Biomedical Engineering (B M E); Business Administration (BUSAD); Civil Engineering (C E); Community and Regional Planning (C R P); Computer Engineering (CPR E); Computer Science (COM S); Curriculum and Instruction (C I); Design Studies (DSN S); Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (EEOB); Economics (ECON); English (ENGL); Environmental Science (ENSCI); Environmental Studies (ENV S); Event Management (EVENT); Finance (FIN); Genetics (GEN); Genetics, Development and Cell Biology (GDCB); Geology (GEOL); Gerontology (GER); Graphic Design (ARTGR); Industrial Design (IND D); Industrial Engineering (I E); Information Assurance (INFAS); Integrated Studio Arts (ARTIS); Iowa Lakeside Laboratory (IA LL); Journalism and Mass Communication (JL MC); Landscape Architecture (L A); Linguistics (LING); Management Information Systems (MIS); Materials Engineering (MAT E); Materials Science & Engineering (M S E); Mathematics (MATH); Mechanical Engineering (M E); Meteorology (MTEOR); Music (MUSIC); Natural Resource Ecology and Management (NREM); Seed Technology and Business (STB); Software Engineering (S E); Statistics (STAT); Supply Chain Management (SCM); Technology Systems Management (TSM)

Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT 315X. Business Data Streams and Issues. (Cross-listed with MIS 315X.) (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: COM S 113. Identification of open data sources and other private data sources. Develop methods of data access, collection, and sharing; develop methods to validate and standardize data sources; develop methods to assess data worthiness (risk).

ACCT 384: Accounting Information Systems. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 285 or ACCT 501ACCT 301 and MIS 301. Analysis of concepts and procedures underlying the automated accumulation and processing of accounting data. EDP internal control and audit techniques. Trends in accounting information systems.

ACCT 484: Advanced Accounting Information Systems. (Dual-listed with ACCT 584). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 384. Advanced accounting information systems concepts; database design and information retrieval, internal controls within computerized accounting information systems, financial reporting in an electronic environment.

ACCT 584: Advanced Accounting Information Systems. (Dual-listed with ACCT 484). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ACCT 384. Advanced accounting information systems concepts; database design and information retrieval, internal controls within computerized accounting information systems, financial reporting in an electronic environment.

Aerospace Engineering (AER E)

AER E 361: Computational Techniques for Aerospace Design. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: AER E 310MATH 267E M 324E M 345. Advanced programming, workstation environment, and development of computational tools for aerospace analysis and design. Technical report writing.

AER E 483X. Aeroacoustics. (Dual-listed with AER E 583X). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: AER E 311 or M E 335; and MATH 266 or MATH 267. Noise metrics, Linear wave equation and its solution in 1-, 2-, and 3-D using Green's functions. Propagation of sound in free and confined spaces. Aerodynamic noise sources in engineering machines: aircraft engine noise, airfram noise, wind turbine noise, etc.

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (A B E)

A B E 160: Systematic Problem Solving and Computer Programming. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MATH 143 or MATH 165. Engineering approach to problem solution and presentation in the context of real world problems. Introduction to basic principles from statics, projectile motion, conservation of mass and energy and electricity and magnetism. Use of spreadsheet programs and computer programming language(s) to solve and present engineering problems. Introduction to interfacing computers to sensor systems for data collection.

A B E 408: GIS and Natural Resources Management. (Dual-listed with A B E 508). (Cross-listed with ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Working knowledge of computers and Windows environment. Introduction to fundamental concepts and applications of GIS in natural resources management with specific focus on watersheds. Topics include: basic GIS technology, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, and modeling; visualization and display of natural resource data. Case studies in watershed and natural resource management using ArcView GIS.

A B E 503: Modeling, Simulation, and Controls for Agricultural and Biological Systems. (Dual-listed with A B E 403). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: A B E 316, and A B E 363, and MATH 266 or MATH 267
Modeling dynamic systems with ordinary differential equations. Introduction to state variable methods of system analysis. Analysis of mechanical, electrical, and fluid power systems. Analytical and numerical solutions of differential equations. Introduction to classical control theory. Feedback and stability examined in the s domain. Frequency response as an analytical and experimental tool. MATLAB will be used throughout the course for modeling. Individual and/or group projects required for graduate credit.

A B E 504: Instrumentation for Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering. (Dual-listed with A B E 404). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.Prereq: A B E 316 and A B E 363 or CPR E 281. Interfacing techniques for computer-based data acquisition and control systems. Basic interfacing components including A/D and D/A conversion, signal filtering, multiplexing, and process control. Sensors and theory of operation applied to practical monitoring and control problems. Individual and group projects required for graduate credit.

A B E 506: Applied Computational Intelligence. (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: A B E 316 or equivalent, MATH 166STAT 305. Applications of biologically inspired computational intelligence tools for data mining, system modeling, and optimization for agricultural, biological and other engineered systems. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, Fuzzy Logic, Genetic Algorithms, Bayesian and Decision Tree learning. Fundamental Machine Vision techniques will be introduced in the first part of course and be integrated into the lab exercises for learning different computational intelligence techniques. MATLAB will be used throughout the course for algorithm implementation.

A B E 508: GIS and Natural Resources Management. (Dual-listed with A B E 408). (Cross-listed with ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Working knowledge of computers and Windows environment. Introduction to fundamental concepts and applications of GIS in natural resources management with specific focus on watersheds. Topics include: basic GIS technology, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, and modeling; visualization and display of natural resource data. Case studies in watershed and natural resource management using ArcView GIS.

Agronomy (AGRON)

AGRON 452: GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with AGRON 552). (Cross-listed with ENSCI, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100GEOL 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

AGRON 488: GIS for Geoscientists II. (Dual-listed with AGRON 588). (Cross-listed with ENSCI, GEOL). (2-2). Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent. GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

AGRON 513: Quantitative Methods for Agronomy. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: AGRON 114MATH 140STAT 104. Quantitative methods for analyzing and interpreting agronomic information. Principles of experimental design, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, regression, correlation, and graphical representation of data. Use of SAS and Excel for organization, analyzing, and presenting data. Required course for the Master of Science in Agronomy degree program.

AGRON 552: GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with AGRON 452). (Cross-listed with ENSCI, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100GEOL 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

AGRON 588: GIS for Geoscientists II. (Dual-listed with AGRON 488). (Cross-listed with ENSCI, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent. GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

Animal Science (AN S)

AN S 500: Computer Techniques for Biological Research. (2-0) Cr. 1. F. Introduction to UNIX and SAS for solving research problems, including organization of data files, transfer of files between workstations, developing models, and techniques for analysis of designed experiments. Introduction to matrix algebra for solving animal breeding problems using MATLAB and computer simulation.

AN S 500A: Computer Techniques for Biological Research: UNIX and SAS. (2-0) Cr. 1. F. First half semester course. Introduction to UNIX and SAS for solving research problems, including organization of data files, transfer of files between workstations, developing models, and techniques for analysis of designed experiments. Introduction to matrix algebra for solving animal breeding problems using MATLAB and computer simulation.

AN S 500B: Computer Techniques for Biological Research: Problem solving using matrix algebra. (2-0) Cr. 1. F. Second half semester course. Introduction to UNIX and SAS for solving research problems, including organization of data files, transfer of files between workstations, developing models, and techniques for analysis of designed experiments. Introduction to matrix algebra for solving animal breeding problems using MATLAB and computer simulation.

AN S 562A: Methodologies for Population/Quantitative Genetics: Linear Models and Genetic Prediction. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: AN S 561STAT 402. Basic theory for genetic analysis of animal breeding data. Course A (1st half semester) covers linear models, selection index methods, and basic theory for best linear unbiased prediction. Course B (2nd half semester) best linear unbiased prediction, including genetic groups, environmental adjustment, repeated records, multiple trait models, maternal effects models, and theory for maximum likelihood estimation of genetic parameters.

AN S 562B: Methodologies for Population/Quantitative Genetics: Advanced Genetic Prediction&Parameter Estimation. (2-0) Cr. 2. S. Prereq: AN S 561STAT 402. Basic theory for genetic analysis of animal breeding data. Course A (1st half semester) covers linear models, selection index methods, and basic theory for best linear unbiased prediction. Course B (2nd half semester) best linear unbiased prediction, including genetic groups, environmental adjustment, repeated records, multiple trait models, maternal effects models, and theory for maximum likelihood estimation of genetic parameters. 

Apparel, Merchandising and Design (A M D)

A M D 321: Computer Integrated Textile and Fashion Design. (0-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: A M D 210A M D 278 or concurrent enrollment. Permission of instructor. Analysis and advanced use of computer-aided design software for textile and fashion design for various target markets. Digital presentation and portfolio development.

Architecture (ARCH)

ARCH 439X. Computational Design Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Dual-listed with Arch 539X.) Prereqs: Junior Classification. What is the role of the human designer when automation, simulation, and other computationally-driven processes enter into the picture? This seminar approaches such questions from the perspective of architecture and design, supplemented with multidisciplinary readings from mathematics, cognitive science, computer science, evolutionary biology, and philosophy. Students will cultivate a sense of what is possible with new technologies, and to begin to articulate a position -- a theory or theories -- of how humans and computers will design together in the future. Participation required in class discussions and constructive debates.

Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASTRO)

ASTRO 344L: Astronomy Laboratory. (1-6) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: PHYS 222. Experiments in optical astronomy. Observational techniques, ranging from stellar photometry to CCD imaging. Data processing and analysis techniques. Astronomical software packages and online databases and resources. Available instruments include a variety of small telescopes and astronomical CCD cameras.

Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology (BBMB)

BBMB 551X. Computational Biochemistry. (2-0) Cr. 2. F. Prereq: BBMB 404 or equivalent. Biological and structural databases, molecular visualization, sequence comparisons, homology searches, sequence motifs, construction of phylogenetic trees, structure comparisons, protein structure predictions, RNA structure predictions, molecular docking, metabolic pathways.

BBMB 569: Bioinformatics III (Structural Genome Informatics). (Cross-listed with BCB, COM S, CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BCB 567, BBMB 316, GEN 409, STAT 430. Algorithmic and statistical approaches in structural genomics including protein, DNA and RNA structure. Structure determination, refinement, representation, comparison, visualization, and modeling. Analysis and prediction of protein secondary and tertiary structure, disorder, protein cores and surfaces, protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, protein localization and function.

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCB)

BCB 544: Fundamentals of Bioinformatics. (Cross-listed with COM S, CPR E, GDCB). (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: MATH 165 or STAT 401 or equivalent. Survey of key bioinformatics methods, including hands-on use of computational tools to solve various biological problems. Topics include: database searching, sequence alignment, gene prediction, RNA and protein structure prediction, construction of phylogenetic trees, comparative and functional genomics, and systems biology.

BCB 567: Bioinformatics I (Fundamentals of Genome Informatics). (Cross-listed with COM S, CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: COM S 228; COM S 330; credit or enrollment in BIOL 315, STAT 430. Biology as an information science. Review of algorithms and information processing. Generative models for sequences. String algorithms. Pairwise sequence alignment. Multiple sequence alignment. Searching sequence databases. Genome sequence assembly.

BCB 568: Bioinformatics II (Advanced Genome Informatics). (Cross-listed with COM S, GDCB, STAT). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCB 567 or (BIOL 315 and STAT 430), credit or enrollment in GEN 409
Advanced sequence models. Basic methods in molecular phylogeny. Hidden Markov models. Genome annotation. DNA and protein motifs. Introduction to gene expression analysis.

BCB 569: Bioinformatics III (Structural Genome Informatics). (Cross-listed with BBMB, COM S, CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BCB 567, BBMB 316, GEN 409, STAT 430
Algorithmic and statistical approaches in structural genomics including protein, DNA and RNA structure. Structure determination, refinement, representation, comparison, visualization, and modeling. Analysis and prediction of protein secondary and tertiary structure, disorder, protein cores and surfaces, protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, protein localization and function.

BCB 570: Bioinformatics IV (Computational Functional Genomics and Systems Biology). (Cross-listed with COM S, CPR E, GDCB, STAT). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCB 567 or COM S 311, COM S 228, GEN 409, STAT 430
Algorithmic and statistical approaches in computational functional genomics and systems biology. Elements of experiment design. Analysis of high throughput gene expression, proteomics, and other datasets obtained using system-wide measurements. Topological analysis, module discovery, and comparative analysis of gene and protein networks. Modeling, analysis, simulation and inference of transcriptional regulatory modules and networks, protein-protein interaction networks, metabolic networks, cells and systems: Dynamic systems, Boolean, and probabilistic models. Multi-scale, multi-granularity models. Ontology-driven, network based, and probabilistic approaches to information integration.

BCB 590: Special Topics. Cr. arr. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor

BCB 593: Workshop in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (1-0) Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S. Current topics in bioinformatics and computational biology research. Lectures by off-campus experts. Students read background literature, attend preparatory seminars, attend all lectures, meet with lecturers.

BCB 598: Cooperative Education. Cr. R. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Prereq: Permission of the program chair. Off-campus work periods for graduate students in the field of bioinformatics and computational biology. 

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BCBIO)

BCBIO 110: BCBIO Orientation. (1-0) Cr. 0.5. F. First 8 weeks. Orientation to the area of bioinformatics and computational biology. For students considering a major in BCBIO. Specializations and career opportunities. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BCBIO 322: Introduction to Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. (Cross-listed with BIOL, GEN). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BIOL 212. Genome sequencing, assembly, structural and functional annotation, and comparative genomics. Investigating these topics will develop skills in programming and scripting (Perl and/or Python), the use of biological databases, sequence alignment, homology search, identification of sequence patterns, construction of phylogenetic trees, and comparative genomics.

BCBIO 401: Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology I. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: BCBIO 211 and basic programming experience (e.g. COM S 207, COM S 208, COM S 227 or permission of instructor)
Application of computer science to molecular biology. String algorithms, sequence alignments, indexing data structures, homology search methods, pattern recognition, fragment assembly, genome annotation, construction of bioinformatics databases, and gathering and distribution of biological information with the Internet.

BCBIO 402: Fundamentals of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology II. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCBIO 401. Genomics: Gene structure prediction, gene function prediction and comparative genomics. Post-genomics: Gene expression studies, DNA microarrays, next-generation sequencing of transcriptome. Structural biology: Protein and RNA structure predictions, structure representation, comparison and visualization. Systems biology: Signal transduction pathway inference, biological networks and systems.

BCBIO 442: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Techniques. (0.2-0.5) Cr. 0.5. Repeatable, maximum of 2 credits. S.SS. Prereq: BIOL 314 recommended. Modular minicourses consisting of guided tutorials and hands-on computer software exercises focused on fundamental problems, approaches, and software applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BCBIO 442A: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Techniques: Sequence Database Searching. (0.2-0.5) Cr. 0.5. Repeatable, maximum of 2 credits. S.SS. Prereq: BIOL 314 recommended. Modular minicourses consisting of guided tutorials and hands-on computer software exercises focused on fundamental problems, approaches, and software applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BCBIO 442B: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology: Protein Structure Databases, Visualization, and Prediction. (0.2-0.5) Cr. 0.5. Repeatable, maximum of 2 credits. S.SS. Prereq: BIOL 314 recommended. Modular minicourses consisting of guided tutorials and hands-on computer software exercises focused on fundamental problems, approaches, and software applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BCBIO 442C: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Techniques: Phylogenetic Analysis. (0.2-0.5) Cr. 0.5. Repeatable, maximum of 2 credits. S.SS. Prereq: BIOL 314 recommended. Modular minicourses consisting of guided tutorials and hands-on computer software exercises focused on fundamental problems, approaches, and software applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BCBIO 442D: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Techniques: Microarray Analysis. (0.2-0.5) Cr. 0.5. Repeatable, maximum of 2 credits. S.SS. Prereq: BIOL 314 recommended. Modular minicourses consisting of guided tutorials and hands-on computer software exercises focused on fundamental problems, approaches, and software applications in bioinformatics and computational biology. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

BCBIO 444: Bioinformatic Analysis. (Cross-listed with BCB, BIOL, COM S, CPR E, GEN). (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: MATH 165 or STAT 401 or equivalent. Broad overview of bioinformatics with a significant problem-solving component, including hands-on practice using computational tools to solve a variety of biological problems. Topics include: bioinformatic data processing, Perl programming, genome assembly, database search, sequence alignment, gene prediction, next-generation sequencing, comparative and functional genomics, and systems biology.

BCBIO 490: Independent Study. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. F.S.SS. Prereq: BCBIO 211, junior or senior classification, permission of instructor. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may use no more than 9 credits of BCBIO 490 and 491 toward graduation.

BCBIO 491: Team Research Projects. Cr. 1-5. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. Prereq: BCBIO 211, junior or senior classification, permission of instructor. Research projects in bioinformatics and computational biology done by teams of students. Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may use no more than 9 credits of BCBIO 490 and 491 toward graduation.

Biological/Pre-Medical Illustration (BMP I)

BPM I 326: Illustration and Illustration Software. (Cross-listed with ARTIS). (0-6) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: ARTIS 323. Application of painting, drawing, and image making techniques to communication. Development of technical abilities using illustration software. Digital and print production techniques.

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 444: Bioinformatic Analysis. (Cross-listed with BCBIO, COM S, CPR E, GEN). (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: MATH 165 or STAT 401 or equivalent. Broad overview of bioinformatics with a significant problem-solving component, including hands-on practice using computational tools to solve a variety of biological problems. Topics include: bioinformatic data processing, Perl programming, genome assembly, database search, sequence alignment, gene prediction, next-generation sequencing, comparative and functional genomics, and systems biology.

Biomedical Engineering (B M E)

B M E 341: BioMEMs and Nanotechnology. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: B M E 220. Overview of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technologies for bioengineering, fundamentals of microfluidic device design, fabrication, and characterization, survey of microfluidic functional building blocks for lab-on-a-chip applications including mixers, valves, channels, and chambers. Topics of nanotechnology in bioengineering, nanoscale building block technologies for bioengineering including self-assembling, surface chemical treatment, nano-imprinting, nano-particles, nano-tubes, nano-wires, and stimuli-responsive biomaterials.

B M E 341L: BioMEMS and Nanotechnology Laboratory. (0-3) Cr. 1. Prereq: B M E 220, concurrent enrollment in B M E 341. Introductory laboratory course accompanying B M E 341. Design, fabrication, and characterization of BioMEMS lab-on-a-chip devices and nanoscale techniques for bioengineering. Student group projects.

Business Administration (BUSAD)

BUSAD 503: Information Systems. (Cross-listed with STB). (2-0) Cr. 2. Prereq: Admission to MS in Seed Technology and Business program or by special arrangement with the instructor. Introduction to a broad variety of information systems (IS) topics, including current and emerging developments in information technology (IT), IT strategy in the context of corporate strategy, and IS planning and development of enterprise architectures. Cases, reading, and discussions highlight the techniques and tactics used by managers to cope with strategic issues within an increasingly technical and data-driven competitive environment.

Civil Engineering (C E)

C E 510: Information Technologies for Construction. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CON E 422, ENGR 160 or C E 160 or equivalent. Information technologies including microcomputer based systems, management information systems, automation technologies, computer-aided design, and expert systems and their application in the construction industry. Overview of systems acquisition, communications, and networking.

Community and Regional Planning (C R P)

C R P 351X. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CRP 251X. Intermediate GIS for design and non-design students to learn concepts of digital management and representation of spatial data, including spatial problems, data sources and structures, simple spatial operations and cartographic issues. Gain skill set to effectively display feature and tabular data,query features using logical expressions, edit spatial and attribute data, associate tables with joins and relates, produce maps, reports, and graphs.

C R P 450X. Geodesign. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. This course provides an opportunity for students to learn about the fundamental concepts of Geodesign. Geodesign focuses on using a set of techniques and technologies, which can enable stages of project conceptualization, data collection and visualization, spatial analysis, design creation, simulation and stakeholders participation and collaboration. Students read articles discussing Geodesign and watch lectures and presentations given at Geodsign Summits in the USA and Europe. They study applications and study cases in which Geodesign was used and applied. They select a study case and work in interdisciplinary teams to apply learned theoretical Geodesign methodologies and approaches. Students may use any GIS software, ESRI CityEngine, ESRI GeoPlanner and/or Agent-Based Modeling in their studies of the study case.

C R P 451: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Introduction to geographic information systems, including discussions of GIS hardware, software, data structures, data acquisition, data conversion, data presentation, analytical techniques, and implementation procedures. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 452: Geographic Data Management and Planning Analysis. (Dual-listed with C R P 552). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: C R P 451 or equivalent. Extensive coverage of geo-relational database concept and design, GIS database creation and maintenance, geographic data manipulation and analysis. GIS output generation and geographic data presentation. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 454X Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with C R P 554X and L A 554X) Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

C R P 456: GIS Programming and Automation. (Dual-listed with C R P 556). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CRP 451/551 or NREM 345 or NREM 546 or GEOL 552. Introduction to automated geoprocessing in Geographic Information Systems. Focus on learning scripting language and object-oriented programming, automation of custom-designed geoprocessing scripts, and application toward student research and/or interests.

C R P 459X. GeoVisualization: Imagining Maps. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Fundamentals of communication with maps, reading and understanding maps, navigation in cities as well as indoors, usability of online interactive GIS applications, and online GIS-based participatory applications. Students learn to identify spatial research questions, write corresponding research hypothesis and execute experiments in order to collect relevant data, analyze them and present the results in an oral presentation.

C R P 551: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Introduction to geographic information systems, including discussions of GIS hardware, software, data structures, data acquisition, data conversion, data presentation, analytical techniques, and implementation procedures. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 552: Geographic Data Management and Planning Analysis. (Dual-listed with C R P 452). (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: C R P 451 or equivalent. Extensive coverage of geo-relational database concept and design, GIS database creation and maintenance, geographic data manipulation and analysis. GIS output generation and geographic data presentation. Laboratory emphasizes practical applications and uses of GIS.

C R P 553: Analytical Planning/GIS. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: C R P 451/C R P 551. Integration of exploratory, participatory and predictive spatial analyses and 3D visualization into the planning process. GIS tools and techniques are used to automate decision analysis and facilitate future planning in analyzing and visualizing planning actions. Laboratory emphasizes practical uses of GIS tools and techniques.

C R P 554X. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with C R P 454X and L A 554X). Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

C R P 556: GIS Programming and Automation. (Dual-listed with C R P 456). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: CRP 451/551 or NREM 345 or NREM 546 or GEOL 552. Introduction to automated geoprocessing in Geographic Information Systems. Focus on learning scripting language and object-oriented programming, automation of custom-designed geoprocessing scripts, and application toward student research and/or interests.

C R P 559X. Digital Design Methods for Landscape Architecture. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with L A 559X) Introduction to digital tools used by landscape architects for design development and design communication, including 3D modeling, landscape CAD, image processing, geolocation/navigation (GPS), and geospatial data handling (GIS).

Computer Engineering (CPR E)

Any course at 300 level or above in Computer Science (COM S), Computer Engineering (Cpr E) , Management Information Systems (MIS), and Software Engineering (S E) can be chosen.

Computer Science (COM S)

Any course at 300 level or above in Computer Science (COM S), Computer Engineering (Cpr E) , Management Information Systems (MIS), and Software Engineering (S E) can be chosen.

Curriculum and Instruction (C I)

C I 501: Foundations of Digital Learning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification. Educational philosophies and theories of instructional technology. Application of research to the production and use of instructional technology for learning and teaching. Equipment operation.

C I 505: Using Technology in Learning and Teaching. (3-0) Cr. 3. F.S.SS. Prereq: Graduate classification. Teaching and learning using computers. Selection and evaluation of software and hardware for teaching and learning. Research on computers. Tool software. Telecommunications. Trends in computer-based instruction.

Design Studies (DSN S)

DSN S 332: Multi-Dimensional Digital Design Communication. Cr. 3. Prereq: ARCH 230, ARTGR 275, DSN S 232, or permission of the instructor. Investigations if interoperable digital-design tools, techniques and methods directed at human scale interactive hybrid design from ideation to visualization, synthesis to analysis, and realization to fabrication.

Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology (EEOB)

EEOB 542: Introduction to Molecular Biology Techniques. (Cross-listed with B M S, FS HN, GDCB, HORT, NREM, NUTRS, V MPM, VDPAM). Cr. 1. Repeatable. F.S.SS. Sessions in basic molecular biology techniques and related procedures. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

Economics (ECON)

ECON 418: Introduction to Game Theory. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: ECON 301. Systematic introduction to game theory and its uses in economics. Develops the basic framework, models and tools necessary to analyze games of strategy, including: Strategic and extensive-form representations of games; best response functions and Nash equilibrium, mixed strategies backward induction and subgame-perfect equilibrium, imperfect and incomplete information, Bayesian and sequential equilibria. Examples and applications taken from economics, business, political science, law and biology.

English (ENGL)

ENGL 516: Methods of Formal Linguistic Analysis. Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGL/LING 219 or equivalent. Data and knowledge structures for formal representation of natural language and speech data. Designing and implementing algorithms for automating linguistic analysis tasks. Conceptual issues for natural language and speech processing programming.

ENGL 520: Computational Analysis of English. (Cross-listed with HCI, LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGL 510 or LING 510, and ENGL 511 or LING 511. Concepts and practices for analysis of English by computer with emphasis on the applications of computational analysis to problems in applied linguistics such as corpus analysis and recognition of learner language in computer-assisted learning and language assessment.

ENGL 526: Computer-Assisted Language Learning. (Cross-listed with LING). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGL 511 or LING 511 or equivalent. Theory, research, and practice in computer use for teaching nonnative speakers of English. Methods for planning and evaluating computer-based learning activities.

Environmental Science (ENSCI)

ENSCI 370: GIS for Ecology and Environmental Science. (Cross-listed with BIOL). Cr. 1-6. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Six credits in biological and /or physical sciences, and permission of instructor. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on ecological and environmental applications. No prior GIS experience required. Guided, individualized study of topics based on student background and interest. For students with prior experience, topics and activities are selected to build upon any previous experience and minimize duplication to previous GIS coursework. Potential topics include: basic concepts of GIS, data structures, database management, spatial analysis, modeling and visualization of ecological and environmental data. Case studies in ecological and environmental applications using ArcGIS. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

ENSCI 452: GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 552). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100, GEOL 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

ENSCI 461I: Introduction to GIS. (Cross-listed with ENV S, IA LL, L A). Cr. 4. SS. Descriptive and predictive GIS modeling techniques, spatial statistics, and map algebra. Application of GIS modeling techniques to environmental planning and resource management.

ENSCI 488: GIS for Geoscientists II. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 588). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345, NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent. GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

ENSCI 546: Integrating GPS and GIS for Natural Resource Management. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 446). (Cross-listed with NREM). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 12 credits in student's major at 300 level or above, NREM 345 or equivalent experience with ArcGIS. Emphasis on the use of GPS as a data collection tool for GIS. Basic theory of GPS. Use of Global Positioning System technology for spatial data collection and navigation. Post-processing and real-time correction of GPS data. GPS data transfer to GIS for mapping applications. Use of GIS to construct waypoints for use in GPS navigation.

ENSCI 551: Applied and Environmental Geophysics. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 451). (Cross-listed with GEOL). (2-2). Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GEOL 100 or GEOL 201, college algebra and trigonometry. Seismic, gravity, magnetic, resistivity, electromagnetic, and ground-penetrating radar techniques for shallow subsurface investigations and imaging. Data interpretation methods. Lab emphasizes computer interpretation packages. Field work with seismic - and resistivity-imaging systems and radar.

ENSCI 552: GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 452). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100, GEOL 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

ENSCI 588: GIS for Geoscientists II. (Dual-listed with ENSCI 488). (Cross-listed with AGRON, GEOL). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345, NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent. GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

Environmental Studies (ENV S)

ENV S 461I: Introduction to GIS. (Cross-listed with ENSCI, IA LL, L A). Cr. 4. SS. Descriptive and predictive GIS modeling techniques, spatial statistics, and map algebra. Application of GIS modeling techniques to environmental planning and resource management.

Event Management (EVENT)

Finance (FIN)

FIN 550: Financial Econometrics. (3-0) Cr. 3.  Prereq: FIN 501, ECON 571. Analysis, modeling, and forecasting of time series data, volatility modeling and forecasting, maximum likelihood estimation, robust standard error computation, specification testing, estimation under alternative distributional assumptions, and Monte Carlo simulation. Applications include tests of asset pricing models, analysis of asset volatility, corporate event studies, and value at risk analysis.

Genetics (GEN)

GEN 444: Bioinformatic Analysis. (Cross-listed with BCB, BCBIO, BIOL, COM S, CPR E). (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: MATH 165 or STAT 401 or equivalent. Broad overview of bioinformatics with a significant problem-solving component, including hands-on practice using computational tools to solve a variety of biological problems. Topics include: bioinformatic data processing, Perl programming, genome assembly, database search, sequence alignment, gene prediction, next-generation sequencing, comparative and functional genomics, and systems biology.

Genetics, Development and Cell Biology (GDCB)

GDCB 544: Fundamentals of Bioinformatics. (Cross-listed with BCB, COM S, CPR E). (4-0) Cr. 4. F. Prereq: MATH 165 or STAT 401 or equivalent. Survey of key bioinformatics methods, including hands-on use of computational tools to solve various biological problems. Topics include: database searching, sequence alignment, gene prediction, RNA and protein structure prediction, construction of phylogenetic trees, comparative and functional genomics, and systems biology.

GDCB 568: Bioinformatics II (Advanced Genome Informatics). (Cross-listed with BCB, COM S, STAT). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCB 567 or (BIOL 315 and STAT 430), credit or enrollment in GEN 409. Advanced sequence models. Basic methods in molecular phylogeny. Hidden Markov models. Genome annotation. DNA and protein motifs. Introduction to gene expression analysis.

GDCB 570: Bioinformatics IV (Computational Functional Genomics and Systems Biology). (Cross-listed with BCB, COM S, CPR E, STAT). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCB 567 or COM S 311, COM S 228, GEN 409, STAT 430. Algorithmic and statistical approaches in computational functional genomics and systems biology. Elements of experiment design. Analysis of high throughput gene expression, proteomics, and other datasets obtained using system-wide measurements. Topological analysis, module discovery, and comparative analysis of gene and protein networks. Modeling, analysis, simulation and inference of transcriptional regulatory modules and networks, protein-protein interaction networks, metabolic networks, cells and systems: Dynamic systems, Boolean, and probabilistic models. Multi-scale, multi-granularity models. Ontology-driven, network based, and probabilistic approaches to information integration.

Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 452: GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with GEOL 552). (Cross-listed with AGRON, ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100, GEOL 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

GEOL 488: GIS for Geoscientists II. (Dual-listed with GEOL 588). (Cross-listed with AGRON, ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345, NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent. GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

GEOL 489: Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies. (Dual-listed with GEOL 589). (Cross-listed with E E, MTEOR, NREM). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic-radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications. Also offered online S.

GEOL 489L: Satellite Remote Sensing Laboratory. (Dual-listed with GEOL 589L). (Cross-listed with E E, MTEOR, NREM). (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Completion or concurrent enrollment in MTEOR/GEOL/NREM/EE 489/589. Processing and analysis of satellite sensor data (optical and radar). Provides practical applications in an environmental context.

GEOL 552: GIS for Geoscientists. (Dual-listed with GEOL 452). (Cross-listed with AGRON, ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: GEOL 100, GEOL 201 or equivalent. Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with particular emphasis on geoscientific data. Uses ESRI's ArcGIS Desktop Software and extension modules. Emphasizes typical GIS operations and analyses in the geosciences to prepare students for advanced GIS courses.

GEOL 558: Introduction to the 3D Visualization of Scientific Data. (Cross-listed with COM S, HCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: Graduate-student standing in the mathematical or natural sciences or engineering; basic programming knowledge. Introduction to visualizing scientific information with 3D computer graphics and their foundation in human perception. Overview of different visualization techniques and examples of 3D visualization projects from different disciplines (natural sciences, medicine, and engineering). Class project in interactive 3D visualization using the ParaView, Mayavi, TVTK, VTK or a similar system.

GEOL 588: GIS for Geoscientists II. (Dual-listed with GEOL 488). (Cross-listed with AGRON, ENSCI). (2-2) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: GIS course, such as GEOL 452, CRP 451, CRP 452, NREM 345, NREM 446, AE 408 or equivalent. GIS course with focus on the spatial analysis and modeling of raster data and triangulated irregular network (TIN) data. Uses ArcGIS and various extensions, such as Spatial Analyst, 3D Analyst, and ArcScene. Includes practical exercises during lectures, lab exercises, homework assignments, and (for GEOL 588) a class project.

GEOL 590P: Special Topics: Computational Methods and GIS. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor

Gerontology (GER)

GERON 414: Gerontechnology in Smart Home Environments. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: COM S 227 or (COM S 207 or GERON 377 or ARTGR 271) or equivalent. An interdisciplinary course designed for students who are interested in assistive technology, pervasive computing, mobile computing and principles of universal and inclusive design for end users, in particular, the elderly population. Students will work in semester-long projects as interdisciplinary teams to apply knowledge obtained from lectures and mutual presentations. For graduate credit students are required to submit a research report and give an oral presentation.

Graphic Design (ARTGR)  

ARTGR 473: Multimedia Design. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 573). (0-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: Undergraduate: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470Graduate: graduate enrollment in College of Design. The design of visual, aural and textual communication for electronic media.

ARTGR 573: Multimedia Design. (Dual-listed with ARTGR 473). (0-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: Undergraduate: Concurrent enrollment in ARTGR 370, ARTGR 371, or ARTGR 470Graduate: graduate enrollment in College of Design
The design of visual, aural and textual communication for electronic media. 

Industrial Design (IND D)

IND D 341: Computer Aided Industrial Design I. (0-6) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: IND D 301. Emphasis on the computer as an industrial design and visualization tool.

IND D 541: Computer Aided Industrial Design. (0-6) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Completion of industrial design studio or permission of instructor. Exploration of the computer as an industrial design and visualization tool. Advanced concepts in computer to machine interface for manufacture.

Industrial Engineering (I E)

I E 312: Optimization. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in MATH 267. Concepts, optimization and analysis techniques, and applications of operations research. Formulation of mathematical models for systems, concepts, and methods of improving search, linear programming and sensitivity analysis, network models, and integer programming.

I E 432: Industrial Automation. (2-3) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: PHYS 222. Overview of electrical circuit theory and its relationship to industrial control systems. Theory and application of transducers in the form of sensors and actuators, with applications in manufacturing, distribution and mechanical systems. Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), their programming and use for automation solutions. Introduction of automated identification systems such as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and Bar Coding technologies.

I E 449: Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing. (Dual-listed with I E 549). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq:  Prereq: I E 248 or similar manufacturing engineering course, MATH 265. Representation and interpretation of curves, surfaces and solids. Parametric curves and surfaces and solid modeling. Use of CAD software and CAD/CAM integration. Computer numerical control, CNC programming languages, and process planning.

I E 483: Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. (Dual-listed with I E 583). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: I E 148, I E 312, and STAT 231. Introduction to data warehouses and knowledge discovery. Techniques for data mining, including probabilistic and statistical methods, genetic algorithms and neural networks, visualization techniques, and mathematical programming. Advanced topics include web-mining and mining of multimedia data. Case studies from both manufacturing and service industries. A computing project is required.

I E 519: Simulation Modeling and Analysis. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: COM S 311, STAT 401. Event scheduling, process interaction, and continuous modeling techniques. Probability and statistics related to simulation parameters including run length, inference, design of experiments, variance reduction, and stopping rules. Aspects of simulation languages.

I E 534: Linear Programming. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: I E 312. Formulation of optimization problems as mathematical models, including linear programming, integer programming concepts, multi-objective optimization, and bilevel optimization. Introduction to classic optimization algorithms, including Simplex, cutting plane, and branch-and-bound. Basic concepts of duality theory and sensitivity analysis. Using computer solvers (Matlab and Gusek) to obtain optimal solutions to optimization models.

I E 549: Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing. (Dual-listed with I E 449). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq:  Prereq: I E 248 or similar manufacturing engineering course, MATH 265.
Representation and interpretation of curves, surfaces and solids. Parametric curves and surfaces and solid modeling. Use of CAD software and CAD/CAM integration. Computer numerical control, CNC programming languages, and process planning.

I E 583: Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining. (Dual-listed with I E 483). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: I E 148, I E 312, and STAT 231. Introduction to data warehouses and knowledge discovery. Techniques for data mining, including probabilistic and statistical methods, genetic algorithms and neural networks, visualization techniques, and mathematical programming. Advanced topics include web-mining and mining of multimedia data. Case studies from both manufacturing and service industries. A computing project is required.

I E 588: Information Systems for Manufacturing. (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: I E 148, I E 448. Design and implementation of systems for the collection, maintenance, and usage of information needed for manufacturing operations, such as process control, quality, process definition, production definitions, inventory, and plant maintenance. Topics include interfacing with multiple data sources, methods to utilize the information to improve the process, system architectures, and maintaining adequate and accurate data for entities internal and external to the enterprise to achieve best manufacturing practices. 

Information Assurance (INFAS) 

INFAS 332: Cyber Defense Competition. (Cross-listed with CPR E). (0-2) Cr. 1. Repeatable. S. Participation in cyber defense competition driven by scenario-based network design. Includes computer system setup, risk assessment and implementation of security systems, as well as defense of computer and network systems against trained attackers. Team based. Offered on a satisfactory-fail basis only.

INFAS 530: Network Protocols and Security. (Cross-listed with CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CPR E 381 or equivalent. Detailed examination of networking standards, protocols, and their implementation. TCP/IP protocol suite, network application protocols. Network security issues, attack and mitigation techniques. Emphasis on laboratory experiments.

INFAS 531: Information System Security. (Cross-listed with CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CPR E 489 or CPR E 530 or COM S 586 or MIS 535. Computer, software, and data security: basic cryptography, security policies, multilevel security models, attack and protection mechanisms, legal and ethical issues.

INFAS 532: Information Warfare. (Cross-listed with CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: CPR E 531. Computer system and network security: implementation, configuration, testing of security software and hardware, network monitoring. Authentication, firewalls, vulnerabilities, exploits, countermeasures. Study and use of attack tools. Ethics in information assurance. Emphasis on laboratory experiments.

INFAS 533: Cryptography. (Cross-listed with CPR E, MATH). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 301 or CPR E 310 or COM S 330. Basic concepts of secure communication, DES and AES, public-key cryptosystems, elliptic curves, hash algorithms, digital signatures, applications. Relevant material on number theory and finite fields.

INFAS 534: Legal and Ethical Issues in Information Assurance. (Cross-listed with CPR E, POL S). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Graduate classification; CPR E 531 or INFAS 531. Legal and ethical issues in computer security. State and local codes and regulations. Privacy issues.

INFAS 535: Steganography and Digital Image Forensics. (Cross-listed with CPR E, MATH). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: E E 524 or MATH 317 or MATH 407 or COM S 330. Basic principles of covert communication, steganalysis, and forensic analysis for digital images. Steganographic security and capacity, matrix embedding, blind attacks, image forensic detection and device identification techniques. Related material on coding theory, statistics, image processing, pattern recognition.

INFAS 536: Computer and Network Forensics. (Cross-listed with CPR E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: CPR E 489 or CPR E 530. Fundamentals of computer and network forensics, forensic duplication and analysis, network surveillance, intrusion detection and response, incident response, anonymity and pseudonymity, privacy-protection techniques, cyber law, computer security policies and guidelines, court testimony and report writing, and case studies. Emphasis on hands-on experiment

INFAS 538: Reverse Engineering and Security Testing. (Cross-listed with CPR E). (2-3) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: COM S 321 or CPR E 381, COM S 352 or CPR E 308. Techniques and tools for understanding the behavior of software/hardware systems based on reverse engineering. Flaw hypothesis, black, grey, and white box testing as well as other methods for testing the security of software systems. Discussion of counter-reverse engineering techniques.

INFAS 560X. Data-Driven Security and Privacy. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with CPR E 560X and COM S 560X). Prereqs: CPR E 531; COM S 474 or Com S 573. Examination of applications of machine learning and big data techniques to various security and privacy problems, as well as secure and privacy-preserving machine learning algorithms.

INFAS 592: Seminar in Information Assurance. Cr. 1-3. Repeatable. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Projects or seminar in Information Assurance.

Integrated Studio Arts (ARTIS)

ARTIS 407: Principles of 3D Character Animation. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 507). (0-6) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 9 credits. Prereq: ARTIS 308
 Animation techniques using the computer and available software. Principles of character animation. Prior knowledge of modeling, lighting, texturing and rendering with available software is assumed.

ARTIS 408: Principles of 3D Animation. (0-6) Cr. 3. Repeatable. Prereq: ARTIS 308.  Animation techniques using the computer and available software. Principles of animation. Prior knowledge of modeling, lighting, texturing, animation and rendering with computer and available software is assumed.

ARTIS 408H: Principles of 3D Animation: Honors. (0-6) Cr. 3-4. Repeatable. Prereq: ARTIS 308. Animation techniques using the computer and available software. Principles of animation. Prior knowledge of modeling, lighting, texturing, animation and rendering with computer and available software is assumed.

ARTIS 409: Computer/Video Game Design and Development. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 509). (0-6) Cr. 3. Repeatable, maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: Permission of instructor. Programming emphasis: COM S 227, COM S 228, COM S 229 or equivalent in engineering; art or graphics emphasis: ARTIS 230 and ARTIS 308; writing emphasis: an English course in creative writing or writing screen plays; business or marketing students: Junior classification
 Independent project based creation and development of "frivolous and non-frivolous" computer games in a cross-disciplinary team. Projects require cross-disciplinary teams. Aspects of Indie development and computer/video game history will be discussed.

ARTIS 473: Video Art. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 573). (0-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: ARTIS 212 or permission of instructor. Usage of professional video editing software and application of best practices for video production and post-production to realize original artworks. Creation of narrative and non-narrative videos and site specific video installations. prominent examples in the history of video art provide context for the coursework. Non-repeatable for graduate students.

ARTIS 548: Digital Textile Design. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 448). (0-6) Cr. 3. Repeatable. F.S. Prereq: Junior classification in either College of Design or Apparel, Merchandising, & Design. This hands-on studio course will allow students to explore digital printing technology and its application to textile design for those working within industry as well as independent studio practitioners. Digital design development includes pattern repeats and photo manipulation to create unique textile designs for fashion, interior and fine art applications.

ARTIS 573: Video Art. (Dual-listed with ARTIS 473). (0-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: ARTIS 212 or permission of instructor. Usage of professional video editing software and application of best practices for video production and post-production to realize original artworks. Creation of narrative and non-narrative videos and site specific video installations. prominent examples in the history of video art provide context for the coursework. Non-repeatable for graduate students.

ARTIS 590C: Special Topics: Computer Art and Design. Cr. arr. Prereq: Bachelor degree in art and/or design, or evidence of satisfactory equivalency in specialized area. Written approval of instructor and department chair on required form in advance of semester of enrollment.

Iowa Lakeside Laboratory (IA LL)

IA LL 461I: Introduction to GIS. (Cross-listed with ENSCI, ENV S, L A). Cr. 4. SS. Descriptive and predictive GIS modeling techniques, spatial statistics, and map algebra. Application of GIS modeling techniques to environmental planning and resource management.

IA LL 532: Analysis of Environmental Data. (2-0) Cr. 2. SS. Prereq: An undergraduate course in statistics, understanding of basic concepts such as correlation and regression, and familiarity with PC-based software for data analysis. Analysis of Environmental Data will provide students with training in the theory and application of a range of statistical techniques useful for the analysis of ecological and paleoecological data. Topics will include data management, exploratory data analysis, regression analysis, direct and indirect ordination methods, classification techniques, transfer functions and the analysis of temporal data. Practical classes will provide hands-on training in the use of statistical and graphical software including R, CANOCO, C2, and TWINSPAN. The course will be directed towards advanced undergraduate, graduate and working professionals in ecology and paleoecology.

Journalism and Mass Communication (JL MC)

JL MC 306: Electronic Media Production. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Minimum of C+ in JL MC 201. Introduction to studio production using professional equipment. Course focus on visual concepts, maintenance and practical operation of studio equipment.

JL MC 307: Digital Video Production. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: JL MC 242. Creation of video productions for use as communication tools in advertising, promotions, short documentaries and public relations. Technical and artistic fundamentals of video production including planning, scripting, shooting, lighting and digital editing.

JL MC 315: Multimedia Production. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: JL MC 308 or JL MC 310 or JL MC 316 or equivalent computer design proficiency. Visual storytelling concepts and principles for evaluating, constructing and designing information for the Web and other electronic publication systems. Issues of ethics and ownership of work pertinent to the new media.

JL MC 316: Introduction to Digital Publishing. (2-2) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Credit or enrollment in JL MC 242 and C+ or better in JL MC 201. Digital publishing and beginning techniques in layout, photo editing and vector artwork. Application of visual principles to design simple print projects.

JL MC 317: Publishing for Mobile Devices. (2-2) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: JL MC 316 or equivalent computer design proficiency and JL MC 310 or 315. Creating, designing and publishing content for mobile devices (e.g., cell phones and tablets). Use of digital publishing tools (e.g., In Design). Exposure to animation and video editing software.

Landscape Architecture (L A)

L A 461I: Introduction to GIS. (Cross-listed with ENSCI, ENV S, IA LL). Cr. 4. SS. Descriptive and predictive GIS modeling techniques, spatial statistics, and map algebra. Application of GIS modeling techniques to environmental planning and resource management.

L A 490K: Independent Study: Computer Applications. Cr. 1-6. Repeatable, maximum of 3 times. F.S.SS. Prereq: Written approval of instructor and department chair on required form. Investigation of a topic of special interest to the student.

L A 554X. Fundamentals of Remote Sensing. Cr. 3. S. (Cross-listed with C R P 454X and C R P 554X).  Introduction to remote sensing techniques needed for basic analysis of satellite images, including: filtering and conflation techniques, stacking, pan sharpening, image rectification, image enhancement, unsupervised and supervised classification. Practical applications in a variety of topics to understand how to interpret images.

L A 567: Advanced GIS Landscape Modeling. (0-6) Cr. 3. Prereq: L A 302 or C R P 451/C R P 551. Application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) modeling techniques to landscape planning and management issues. Selection, acquisition, and conversion of digital landscape data. Modeling applications for studio projects, outreach projects, and research projects.

L A 590K: Special Topics: Computer Applications. Cr. 1-6. Repeatable, maximum of 3 times. F.S.SS. Prereq: graduate standing.

Linguistics (LING)

LING 331: Theory of Computing. (Cross-listed with COM S). (3-1) Cr. 3. F.S. Prereq: Minimum of C- in COM S 228, MATH 166, and in COM S 230 or CPR E 310; ENGL 250. Models of computation: finite state automata, pushdown automata and Turing machines. Study of grammars and their relation to automata. Limits of digital computation, unsolvability and Church-Turing thesis. Chomsky hierarchy and relations between classes of languages.

LING 410X. Language as Data.  (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Junior standing. Methods of discovering language patterns in text documents solve practical text analysis problems in the disciplines. Fundamentals of linguistics and its role in text analysis. Practice writing R scripts to perform text analysis and visualize textual data.

LING 510: Introduction to Computers in Applied Linguistics. (Cross-listed with ENGL). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: Graduate classification. Use of software and web applications for language teaching, linguistic analysis, and statistical analysis. Issues and problems in applied linguistics related to computer methods.

LING 520: Computational Analysis of English. (Cross-listed with ENGL, HCI). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: ENGL 510 or LING 510, and ENGL 511 or LING 511. Concepts and practices for analysis of English by computer with emphasis on the applications of computational analysis to problems in applied linguistics such as corpus analysis and recognition of learner language in computer-assisted learning and language assessment.

Management Information Systems (MIS)

Any course at 300 level or above in Computer Science (COM S), Computer Engineering (Cpr E) , Management Information Systems (MIS), and Software Engineering (S E) can be chosen.

Materials Engineering (MAT E)

MAT E 316: Computational Methods in Materials. (3-0) Cr. 3. S.SS. Prereq: MAT E 215. Use of mathematical and statistical computer tools for materials design and analysis. Applications of statistical principles to problems concerned with materials. Computer-assisted design of experiments.

Materials Science & Engineering (M S E)

M S E 581: Computational Modeling of Materials. (Dual-listed with MAT E 481). (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 265 and (MatE 311 or ChE 381 or CHEM 325 or PHYS 304). Introduction to the basic methods used in the computational modeling and simulation of materials, from atomistic simulations to methods at the mesoscale. Students will be expected to develop and run sample programs. Topics to be covered include, for example, electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, phase-field methods, etc.

Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 424: Introduction to High Performance Computing. (Cross-listed with COM S, CPR E). (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 265; MATH 207 or MATH 317. Numerical serial and parallel computing using the Message Passing Interface. Oral and written semester project.

MATH 533: Cryptography. (Cross-listed with CPR E, INFAS). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MATH 301 or CPR E 310 or COM S 330. Basic concepts of secure communication, DES and AES, public-key cryptosystems, elliptic curves, hash algorithms, digital signatures, applications. Relevant material on number theory and finite fields.

Mechanical Engineering (M E)

M E 419: Computer-Aided Design. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: M E 325. Theory and applications of computer- aided design. Computer graphics programming, solid modeling, assembly modeling, and finite element modeling. Mechanical simulation, process engineering, rapid prototyping and manufacturing integration.

Meteorology (MTEOR)

MTEOR 489: Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 589). (Cross-listed with E E, GEOL, NREM). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic-radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications. Also offered online S.

MTEOR 489L: Satellite Remote Sensing Laboratory. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 589L). (Cross-listed with E E, GEOL, NREM). (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Completion or concurrent enrollment in MTEOR/GEOL/NREM/EE 489/589
 Processing and analysis of satellite sensor data (optical and radar). Provides practical applications in an environmental context

MTEOR 507: Mesoscale Meteorology. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 407). (Cross-listed with AGRON). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: MATH 166 and MTEOR 443. Gallus. The physical nature and practical consequences of mesoscale atmospheric phenomena. Mesoscale convective systems, fronts, terrain-forced circulations. Observation, analysis, and prediction of mesoscale atmospheric structure. Semester project and in-class presentation required.

MTEOR 518: Microwave Remote Sensing. (Cross-listed with AGRON, E E). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. S., offered even-numbered years. Prereq: MATH 265 or equivalent. Microwave remote sensing of Earth's surface and atmosphere using satellite-based or ground-based instruments. Specific examples include remote sensing of atmospheric temperature and water vapor, precipitation, ocean salinity, and soil moisture.

MTEOR 552: Climate Modeling. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 452). (3-0) Cr. 3. Alt. F., offered odd-numbered years. Prereq: MTEOR 301. Developing and working with climate models based on fundamental physical principles that govern the climate systems of the Earth and other planets. Emphasis on coupled, nonlinear-system interactions of physical processes such as circulation dynamics, radiative transfer, and cloud/precipitation physics, starting with fairly simple 0- and 1-dimensional analytical and numerical models based on energy, mass, and momentum conservation. Observational study of seasonally evolving weather patterns that form climates around the world.

MTEOR 589: Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 489). (Cross-listed with E E, GEOL, NREM). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic-radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications. Also offered online S.

MTEOR 589L: Satellite Remote Sensing Laboratory. (Dual-listed with MTEOR 489L). (Cross-listed with E E, GEOL, NREM). (0-3) Cr. 1. S. Prereq: Completion or concurrent enrollment in MTEOR/GEOL/NREM/EE 489/589. Processing and analysis of satellite sensor data (optical and radar). Provides practical applications in an environmental context.

Music (MUSIC)

MUSIC 346: MIDI and Digital Audio Techniques. (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: MUSIC 246 or permission of instructor. Advanced MIDI and digital audio programming applications for composition and live performance.

Natural Resource Ecology and Management (NREM)

NREM 546: Integrating GPS and GIS for Natural Resource Management. (Dual-listed with NREM 446). (Cross-listed with ENSCI). (2-3) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: 12 credits in student's major at 300 level or above, NREM 345 or equivalent experience with ArcGIS. Emphasis on the use of GPS as a data collection tool for GIS. Basic theory of GPS. Use of Global Positioning System technology for spatial data collection and navigation. Post-processing and real-time correction of GPS data. GPS data transfer to GIS for mapping applications. Use of GIS to construct waypoints for use in GPS navigation.

NREM 589: Survey of Remote Sensing Technologies. (Dual-listed with NREM 489). (Cross-listed with E E, GEOL, MTEOR). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: Four courses in physical or biological sciences or engineering. Electromagnetic-radiation principles, active and passive sensors, multispectral and hyperspectral sensors, imaging radar, SAR, thermal imaging, lidar. Examples of applications. Also offered online S.

Seed Technology and Business (STB)

STB 503: Information Systems. (Cross-listed with BUSAD). (2-0) Cr. 2. Prereq: Admission to MS in Seed Technology and Business program or by special arrangement with the instructor. Introduction to a broad variety of information systems (IS) topics, including current and emerging developments in information technology (IT), IT strategy in the context of corporate strategy, and IS planning and development of enterprise architectures. Cases, reading, and discussions highlight the techniques and tactics used by managers to cope with strategic issues within an increasingly technical and data-driven competitive environment.

Software Engineering (S E)

Any course at 300 level or above in Computer Science (COM S), Computer Engineering (Cpr E) , Management Information Systems (MIS), and Software Engineering (S E) can be chosen.

Statistics (STAT)

STAT 528X. Visual Business Analytics. (3-0 approx., online only) Cr. 3. F. Prereqs: Admission to the Master of Business Analytics Program. Types of data displays; numerical and visual summaries of data; data structures for data displays; data vs info graphics; good practices of displaying data; human perception and cognition in data displays; graphics as tools of data exploration; graphical diagnostics of statistical models and machine learning procedures; strategies and techniques for data visualizations; basics of reproducibility and repeatability; web-based interactive applets for visual presentation of data and results; programming in R. May not be used for graduate credit in the Statistics program.

STAT 568: Bioinformatics II (Advanced Genome Informatics). (Cross-listed with BCB, COM S, GDCB). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCB 567 or (BIOL 315 and STAT 430), credit or enrollment in GEN 409. Advanced sequence models. Basic methods in molecular phylogeny. Hidden Markov models. Genome annotation. DNA and protein motifs. Introduction to gene expression analysis.

STAT 570: Bioinformatics IV (Computational Functional Genomics and Systems Biology). (Cross-listed with BCB, COM S, CPR E, GDCB). (3-0) Cr. 3. S. Prereq: BCB 567 or COM S 311, COM S 228, GEN 409, STAT 430. Algorithmic and statistical approaches in computational functional genomics and systems biology. Elements of experiment design. Analysis of high throughput gene expression, proteomics, and other datasets obtained using system-wide measurements. Topological analysis, module discovery, and comparative analysis of gene and protein networks. Modeling, analysis, simulation and inference of transcriptional regulatory modules and networks, protein-protein interaction networks, metabolic networks, cells and systems: Dynamic systems, Boolean, and probabilistic models. Multi-scale, multi-granularity models. Ontology-driven, network based, and probabilistic approaches to information integration.

Supply Chain Management (SCM)

SCM 340: Project Management. (Cross-listed with MIS). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: credit or enrollment in MIS 301. Equips students to support team activities in the general project management environment and better manage their careers. Practical experience using project management techniques and tools. Course topics include project initiation and execution, risk assessment, estimating and contracts, planning, human factors, and standard methods.

SCM 440: Supply Chain Information Systems. (Cross-listed with MIS). (3-0) Cr. 3. Prereq: MIS 301, SCM 301. Internal and inter-organizational information systems necessary for a supply chain to achieve competitive advantage. Topics include: design, development, implementation, and maintenance of supply chain information systems; enterprise resource planning; advanced planning and scheduling, manufacturing execution systems; and the interface between manufacturing planning and control processes, logistics processes, and the information system.

Technology Systems Management (TSM)

TSM 333: Precision Farming Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: MATH 140 or higher, junior or senior classification. Geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS). Hardware systems for precision farming emphasized. Autosteering and automatic implement control systems. Collection and management of yield data. Sampling strategies for precision farming. Introduction to building fertilizer prescriptions and recommendations. Economic benefits of precision farming systems.

TSM 444: Facility Planning. (3-0) Cr. 3. F. Prereq: TSM 216 and TSM 240; STAT 101 or STAT 104. Fundamental principles and practices in designing, evaluating, and organizing new or existing facilities. Emphasis on CAD-based facility design, production flow analysis, activity relationship analysis, materials handling, office layout, supporting services design, and facility cost analysis.

TSM 465: Automation Systems. (2-2) Cr. 3. S.Prereq: TSM 363. Theory and applications of automation systems. Emphasizes features, capabilities, design and programming skills of Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based industrial control systems. Introduction to industrial robots and sensors.

TSM 533X. Precision Agriculture. (2-2) Cr.3. F. Prereq: MATH 140 or higher. Geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS). Hardware systems for precision farming emphasized. Auto steering and automatic implement control systems. Collection and management of yield data. Sampling strategies for precision farming. Introduction to building fertilizer prescriptions and recommendations. Economic benefits of precision farming systems. Individual project required for graduate credit.

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